Science & Christianity

Wicked Problems: A Personal and Painful Journey by Richard Gijsbers

Richard Gijsbers BForSc (Melb), DipFor (Cres) is an ISCAST Fellow. 

In the 1970s social planners vented their frustration about complex social problems. Why couldn't we close the gap between indigenous people’s health and that of the rest of us? It was not for lack of trying. Why is protecting nature so difficult? Is the problem with Climate Change really only about “Goodies” vs “Baddies”? Why will we always have the poor with us? Problems like these simply will not go away!

Putting Procrustes to Bed: Newton, Voluntarism and the Development of Science by Robert Brennan

“Foster’s voluntarism hypothesis” is the term often used to name a widely used argument that Foster developed in three papers in the 1930s on the relationship between theology and the development of modern science. It is a complex argument that is not always coherent nor necessarily internally consistent. Nevertheless, this theory is often cited to purportedly explain the influence of Christian theology on the development of modern science. It has often been used as an interpretive tool in relation to Isaac Newton’s understanding of science and the development of science.

Is Science Doomed to Leave Some Questions Unanswered?

"As a science journalist, I’ve been to countless science conferences over the years where I’d hear about the latest discoveries or a plug for a new telescope or particle accelerator destined to yield fresh insights into the workings of nature. But last week I found myself in a small but elegant auditorium at Dartmouth College for a different kind of meeting. Scientists and philosophers had gathered not to celebrate research accomplishments but to argue that science itself is inadequate. As successful as it has undeniably been, they say it cannot provide all the answers we seek."

Science journalist Dan Falk reports in Scientific American on the debate between physicsts and philosophers about the limits of science and whether we will ever solve certain mysteries of the universe and the human mind.

You can read the full article here.

"Unlikely Allies" now available to order!

In Unlikely Allies: Monotheism and the Rise of Science, Mark Worthing investigates the claims of religious traditions that they played a unique role in the rise of the natural sciences. The author argues that monotheism in general, more than any particular manifestation of it, was significant in the development of modern science. Certain key features of monotheism provided fertile conditions for the rise of the natural sciences and Christianity, while not solely responsible for producing these conditions, played a significant role.

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