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ISCAST Fellow Mike Clarke on "Why preserve anything?"

ISCAST fellow Mike Clarke recently featured on an episode of City Bible Forum's Big Questions show. The big question was: Why preserve anything? And, in particular, why should we be concerned with the impact of fire on fauna? Mike is a biologist and bushfire expert. The discussion considered the impact of the bushfires and why we should be concerned about preserving anything at all. The conversation revealed that the standard answers to this big question are surprisingly difficult.

Wicked Problems, Wickedness, and Wisdom: A Theology for the Anthropocene by Mick Pope

This is one paper arising from the Wicked Problems Symposium in Victoria in 2018. Click here to return to the summary report and links to the other papers.

The Antropocene as a wicked problem? Mick Pope describes the nature and history of "the anthropocene" and reflects on our understanding of sin and wisdom.

5G and Modern Communications Technologies as a Wicked Problem: Christian Perspectives by Andrew Wood

This is one paper arising from the Wicked Problems Symposium in Victoria in 2018. Click here to return to the summary report and links to the other papers.

Professor Andrew W Wood BSc (Hons) (Bristol Univ, UK), MSc (Univ of East Anglia, UK), PhD (Univ of London, UK).  Department of Health and Medical Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne.  ISCAST Fellow.  awood@swin.edu.au    

Putting Procrustes to Bed: Newton, Voluntarism and the Development of Science by Robert Brennan

“Foster’s voluntarism hypothesis” is the term often used to name a widely used argument that Foster developed in three papers in the 1930s on the relationship between theology and the development of modern science. It is a complex argument that is not always coherent nor necessarily internally consistent. Nevertheless, this theory is often cited to purportedly explain the influence of Christian theology on the development of modern science. It has often been used as an interpretive tool in relation to Isaac Newton’s understanding of science and the development of science.

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