Science & Christianity

Interviewing Prof. Peter Harrison: Science and faith have a complex historical relationship

ISCAST Executive Director Chris Mulherin interviews Professor Peter Harrison on the history of the complex and interdependent relationship between science and religion in the West.

Peter is an ISCAST fellow and an eminent Australian historian and philosopher. He’s a leading international scholar on the history of science, and says we've been duped into believing in the myth of a perennial conflict between science and Christianity. No, Harrison doesn't use the word 'duped', because he is quiet-spoken, choosing his words with care, and wary of overstating his case.

Why religion is not going away and science will not destroy it

"Religion is not going away any time soon, and science will not destroy it. If anything, it is science that is subject to increasing threats to its authority and social legitimacy. Given this, science needs all the friends it can get. Its advocates would be well advised to stop fabricating an enemy out of religion, or insisting that the only path to a secure future lies in a marriage of science and secularism."

Is God a figment of our imagination? On certainty, scepticism and the limits of proof

A recent lecture by Alister McGrath challenges simplistic notions about truth and knowledge. The lecture begins,

Do we simply make up our most cherished beliefs, creating a world that fits in with our preconceived ideas, or our deepest longings? I am one of many who are concerned that we are moving into a post-truth world ...

Alister will be in Australia at ISCAST's invitation in March 2019.

Read the lecture here.

For the love of science and God: Science's cloud of Christian witnesses from Copernicus to Clark

ISCAST Director, Chris Mulherin, writes in Eternity News, "As we remember the revolution that we call the Reformation, we are also remembering an age when another revolution was in its infancy: the scientific revolution. But what we forget, or perhaps never knew, is that the revolution that gave us science as we know it today, was one largely led by Christian believers faithfully exploring the works of God’s creation and pointed to by the Psalmist: 'The heavens declare the glory of God.' In the words of one writer, '[Nicolaus] Copernicus, as much as Luther, revolutionised how Europeans thought of themselves, their world, and their God.'" 

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