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The Deep Time Issue - A Christian Geologist's Perspective

Prof David Cohen:  ISCAST (NSW) / CASE Meeting 
Date: 18 October, 2010
Venue: New College, University of NSW

 

ISCAST (NSW) - CASE  Lecture: Monday, October 18, 2010, 7.30 pm;
Main Meeting Room, New College, The University of NSW.

David Cohen is the Head of the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences and Deputy President, Academic Board, UNSW, and is a Past-President of the (International) Association of Geochemists.

Prof Cohen has a strong international reputation in his field, with degrees from the University of Sydney, Queen's University in Canada and UNSW, and current interests which include A Geochemical Atlas of Cyprus, geochemical exploration in PNG and geochemical dispersion processes in NSW. The abstract of his lecture follows.

Abstract: Questions surrounding the origins and development of our species have been the subject of much research and speculation in disciplines ranging from Biology to Archeology. The greatest challenge for studies on origins is probably that of "deep time". For biologists, geologists, physicists and even historians dealing with deep time, the window gets progressively dimmer the further we look back, as data become more sparse and less reliable. The quality and quantity of information emerging from deep time is, however, rapidly improving. This is especially the case for the fossil record where recent scientific discoveries indicate the presence of life on Earth in very early stages of Earth history and a succession of major, even cataclysmic, climatic events that reset the path of geological and biological development on Earth. 

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