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Between science and theology: how science learns about unobservable entities

In 1800, someone took the temperature of a rainbow. This story isn’t as strange as it sounds because that ‘someone’ was not the sort of person to look for a pot of gold, but a scientist called William Herschel.
 
 

Beauty in the brain: sleep, disease, and family life

A podcast by Anna Goodman, neuroscientist, and Ruth Bancewicz asking what we can find out from studying neurological disease. How has Anna found a way to fit family life and career together, and how do both of those aspects of life complement her faith and role in the church?

 

2016-11-19 Vic: Faith: what's in a word?

Allan Day Memorial Lecture

Date: Saturday 19 November

Time: 7.30 pm

Topic: Faith: What's in a Word?

Speakers:

  • James Garth - Fellow, ISCAST: Christians in Science & Technology
  • Meredith Doig - President, Rationalist Society of Australia
  • Robert Martin - Director, City Bible Forum Melbourne
  • Michael Clarke - Head of School of Life Sciences, Professor of Zoology, La Trobe University (Chair)

 

Life & faith: going nuclear

Nuclear fusion energy has been heralded as the answer to the global energy crisis, a virtually endless – and cleaner – source of power that will last several generations.
 
 
 

Freewill and the brain: choices, constraints, and community

Have you ever had that slightly disturbing experience of arriving at work and realising that you have very little recollection of how you got there?

 

 

Science alone does not have all the answers

The assumption that science and religion are in conflict is a view that never diminishes.

Many assume that modern science has rendered religious explanations irrelevant, and some go further to say that science alone can answer all of the questions of life.

 

What is a person?

How would you know that a person was a person, if they didn’t come in human form? This is one of the questions that David Lahti, Professor of Biology at Queens College in New York, asked in his lecture on Biology and Personhood at the Faraday Institute this summer.

 

A single migration from Africa populated the world, studies find.

Modern humans evolved in Africa roughly 200,000 years ago. But how did our species go on to populate the rest of the globe?

 
 
 
 
 

Scientists use 'virtual unwrapping' to read ancient biblical scroll reduced to 'lump of charcoal'

Scientists use 'virtual unwrapping' to read ancient biblical scroll reduced to 'lump of charcoal'.
 
Turned to charcoal in a blaze nearly 1,500 years ago, using groundbreaking digital reconstruction the scroll has finally been read and identified as biblical.

 

Cut-throat academia leads to 'natural selection of bad science', claims study

Scientists incentivised to publish surprising results frequently in major journals, despite risk that such findings are likely to be wrong, suggests research.
 
 
 

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ISCAST Fellows

Click here to view a list of ISCAST Fellows and their profiles.