ISCAST Vic: Fire in the Belly

Feb
17
Feb/17 18:30

Camberwell - 32 Fordham Ave, Camberwell

Saturday 17 February

When: 
Saturday, February 17, 2018 - 18:30
Where: 

Camberwell - 32 Fordham Ave, Camberwell

ISCAST Vic is organising a Fire in the Belly event to take place on Saturday 17 February.

Speakers:

  • Murray Hogg, speaking on Theological Authority In the Early Church: Scripture, the Spirit, and Us
  • Michael Smith, speaking on The Creation Myths of Science

The evening will start at 6:30pm with a "Bring Your Own meal to share" and this will be followed at 8:00pm with the presentations and discussions.

Descriptions:

Theological Authority In the Early Church: Scripture, the Spirit, and Us
Throughout his ministry to non-Jews St. Paul came into conflict with those who regarded observance of the Law as a non-negotiable aspect of Christian faith. One question which arose was whether Christian believers could eat meat sacrificed to idols. This seems to have been decided with an emphatic “no” at the Council of Jerusalem in about 50 AD. Yet despite Paul taking part in this council and seemingly in full agreement with its decrees, only a few years later we find him reopening the question in his first letter to the Corinthians (c.53-57 AD). In this letter Paul makes no reference to the Jerusalem Council and even seems in part to reject its conclusion on the matter. More remarkably, neither the council nor Paul draw on scripture in formulating their position. Indeed, the scriptural arguments seem entirely on the side of those whose position they opposed! In this session, we’ll look at the account of the Jerusalem Council (Acts 15) and Paul’s discussion (1 Cor. 8:1-11:1) to see just how the early church formulated its position and see what it can tell us about theological authority in the early church, and what that implies for us.

The Creation Myths of Science
Creation myths are a universal feature of culture and religious belief systems. As our western world increasingly looks to science to shape our worldviews and culture, new creation myths have sprung up from scientific theory. This talk looks at how those new creation myths compete with religious frameworks, what that means for our culture, and how we might learn to tell more valuable creation myths in a scientific age.

Please contact ISCAST Vic by email or phone 03 9254 1045 for further detail.